Road Report - The Fall is Coming Quick in Colorado

Colorado has been incredible, but it is really getting cold. The last few weeks have been incredible. We've found an incredible boondocking location. Helped launch a brand new brewery, and got frozen inside our RV. Why would anyone live any other way?

Once we finished our show at Lazy Boy Brewing in Everett Washington, we headed east through Washington and Idaho with some awesome shows and one our latest in terms of time in Idaho Falls...way past my bedtime ;-). Wyoming was open and beautiful before heading south into Colorado. We stopped at Rabbit Ears Pass above Steamboat Springs at about 9700 feet. It was breathtaking, literally. The first night I woke a couple times feeling as if I were having a panic attack. It turned out to be due to altitude sickness, which we quickly figured out. Then the next morning it started to snow! - We were out of there! We stopped in Steamboat Springs for a dispensary (medicinal) and a local taco shack called TACO CABO. The owner was actually from…

St. James Infirmary by Sweet Sixx and Wild Pack (VIDEO)

St. James Infirmary Blues by Sweet Sixx & The Wild Pack.

The song was originally recorded in Winter 2015 with a condenser mic, laptop in Punta Banda, Baja California, along with drummer Oscar Quiñones Nogueira of Ensenada, then a couple months later we recorded Phillip on sax with the same setup and the addition of a liter of tequila in a small office in San Felipe, Baja California, Mexico. Phillip recorded the entire song in one take after most of the bottle was empty.

This summer while visiting the beautiful home of a new friend and bassist Cindy "Sis" Mitchel in Corvallis Oregon we became inspired to make a video. We thought this song was perfect for what we had in mind and we've always loved it and Phillip's sax playing. So here you go, our first video.

"St. James Infirmary Blues", sometimes known as "Gambler's Blues," is an American folksong of anonymous origin, though sometimes credited to the songwriter Joe Primrose (a pseudonym for Irving Mills). Louis Armstrong made it famous in his influential 1928 recording.